New BrunswickNew Brunswick is the heart of official bilingualism. Bordering with Francophone Quebec, as well as Anglophone Nova Scotia and the state of Maine, the province uses both languages. A bridge over the Northumberland Strait connecting Prince Edward’s island with the continent is located here.

Historically, this area was inhabited by Indians. Based on archaeological research, we know that the settling of other peoples was very rare. Presumably, the Vikings tried to take over these shores in the II century. The next mention of a visit by the Europeans dates back to the XVI century, when the French sailed to the shores of Canada, led by explorer Jacques Cartier. Interestingly, the first nation to drive the Indians away was the Danes.

The province’s internal economy is based on the cultivation of potatoes, which is distributed across the entire country. Mining and quarrying also plays an important role. The richness of the forests is striking in its scope, as they cover almost all of the land.

Due to the fairly small inflow of immigrants, slowly increasing population of Fredericton retains the original beauty of the capital. The city is located at the confluence of two rivers, Nashwaak and Saint John, while its other side meets the Atlantic Ocean.

The mild continental climate is favorable for walks in the national and city parks. Officers’ Park in Gagetown is famous for its military parades. Today, it is populated by artists and actors, and is the oldest city which originally housed the British.

Moosehead Beer is a large Canadian beer-brewing brand, founded in 1867 in Saint John. The town is famous not only for its alcoholic beverages, but also for its incredibly beautiful and high tides.

The Magnetic Hill, which alters the usual concept of gravity, is an entertaining natural phenomenon can be observed in the vicinity of the town Moncton. This hill pushes away metal objects, causing them to float in the air.

The motto of the province: “Hope restored”.